Posts Tagged ‘illustrator’

Every Visual Artist should listen to this about possible copyright changes

July 30, 2015

I was listening to this post hosted by children’s book artist Will Terry. He let artist Brad Holland lead the discussion on visual artist’s and copyrights and how some are trying to change our copyright rights. It’s a pretty deep and intriguing as well as scary conversation about fellow artists futures with their creations. Tune in when you get a chance.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kDoztLDF73I
Everything You Know About Copyright Is About To Change – Brad Holland

Illustration Age Blog

July 26, 2015

I’ve been following Illustration Age blog for a few years now. I recommend it to artists, illustrators, and other creatives related to writing, drawing, designing, publishing, etc. Their are tons of resources to help aid in artists careers; as well as continuing creative education. Check out some of the brief details below on what Illustration Age is about.

We regularly feature new, inspiring, and sometimes groundbreaking artwork from professional Illustrators all over the world. Whether you’re an Artist, Art Director, Artist Representative, or a lover of Illustration, Illustration Age is for you.

We also produce our own illustration-related content, such as:

Introduction to Animal Anatomy Marshall Vandruff

July 17, 2012

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I recommend this tutorial on animal anatomy to anyone that has never studied the anatomical structure and functions of animals, anyone interested in creature design for games and films, or maybe thinking about illustrating them in any field on a professional level. It will also help give you an even clearer understanding on the  how to draw animal books you may or may not have yet.

This comprehensive introduction to animal anatomy is for artists who want to draw authentic-looking animals from their imagination. Marshall demonstrates that the core of this skill is in knowing animal bones and muscles, constructing them as three-dimensional forms, and practicing these disciplines until they become easy enough to let your impulses take over. He uses hundreds of drawings to show the major components of various animals, how their anatomy works, and how to draw them so that they look anatomically authentic, solid and alive. 3D artists looking to enhance their understanding of basic animal form and motion will also benefit from Marshall’s presentation. Instructor for this title: Marshall Vandruff

Purchase the dvd at The Gnomon Workshop link below:

http://www.thegnomonworkshop.com/store/product/867/Introduction-to-animal-anatomy

Marshall Vandruff

Freelance Illustrator

Marshall Vandruff has worked as a writer, illustrator, voice-over artist and consultant for nearly thirty years. His clients include MAD Magazine, Warner Brothers, Hanna-Barbera, Dark Horse Comics, Nickelodeon, Insomniac Games, Disneyland, LeapFrog, Rockstar, Blizzard Entertainment, AutoDesk, The Gnomon Workshop, Imagine FX, and over forty advertising agencies. He has taught over 200 Drawing, Anatomy, and Storytelling courses at colleges, universities, and corporations.

http://www.marshallart.com/

Don Bluth(Dragons Lair Artist) Animation tutorials

October 6, 2010

Don Bluth Animation Tutorials
So, you want to be an animator? Learn from an Animation Master, Don Bluth, through his animation tutorials which are jam-packed with phenomenal techniques and secrets. Get inspired with expert Tips that will instruct you how to design entertaining characters and show you how to develop fresh ideas quickly. These DVD tutorials are intended to expand your understanding of both Traditional and CG animation techniques.  With these informative lessons, you too can have a successful career in the animation industry.
Don’s highly instructional animation dvd’s will motivate you to greater heights whether you’re a young student or a seasoned professional.  All your animation technique questions will be answered in these awesome tutorials.

http://www.donbluthanimation.com/

Free 2d tutorials

October 6, 2010

I checked out a cool 2d tutorial from artist David Revoy using Alchemy, My Paint, and Gimp.

http://www.blendernation.com/2009/08/18/tutorial-painting-time-lapse-by-david-revoy/

Online training for visual artists

July 23, 2010

I found a new art community online training for atists( CGMW). This website features true masters of there craft. There will be several topics relating to arts in the entertainment industry. 

Foundational Classes:

Introduction to Digital Painting

Dynamic Sketching

Intro to Character Design

Intro to Environment Design

Intro to Storyboarding

Analytical Figure drawing

Advanced Classes:

Production Painting

Production Sketching

Character Design ll

Environment Design for Games

Storyboarding for animation

Creature Design

Vehicle and Mechanical Design

ABOUT CGMW

 CG Master Workshops (CGMW) is an online community dedicated to helping artists develop and cultivate their creative talents. Filled with the best possible training around, our online demonstrations will help aspiring artists in their goals of becoming industry artists.

The workshops are taught by the best in the industry; Individuals we like to call “Master’s”. These artists have years of experience and have worked for many of the major studios (including: Disney, Blizzard, DreamWorks, Pixar, Digital Domain, etc.), and are passionate about mentoring the next generation of artists.

Our goal is to provide students with an environment that will help them retain the most from their education, in order to help them achieve their goals in becoming professional artists. Some ways in which this is accomplished, is by:

  • Providing LIVE feedback on each assignment
  • Conducting LIVE working sessions with every student
  • Keeping class sizes relatively small

http://cgmwonline.com/

Where is Art & Design Software Headed?

March 21, 2010

Professionally I’ve been in commercial art, graphic design, and print, for the past 10 years. The first programs I learned were adobe Photoshop, illustrator, quark express, and Macromedia Freehand. From there I learned other programs such as, Corel Draw, Painter, Web plus, Poser, daz 3d, and the list goes on. From my experience with purchasing and trying out different software over this 10 year period has left me in amazement with the progress software and technology has made. One thing I’ve noticed is how software has gotten more affordable, powerful, easy to learn, competitive, universally compatible, and a lot more graphics software has an all in one workflow application. Some software companies such as Corel, Serif, and makers of Xara have combined several applications into one software. This makes it easier for professionals to work in multi-task, fast paced, short deadlines paced work environments. For example, I love the features in Corel Draw’s vector application. You can do page layout, photo retouch, web, print management,  import a bitmap image and edit it within the vector application without having to open a photo application from your computer. Also, when you edit the bitmap it automatically saves the changes on the vector working document. Another example is Xara Extreme’s all in one software package. You can edit photo’s, vector drawing and design, web design, and page layout all in the same package. Als Serif’s programs are all in one applications; Draw Plus  is a powerful application. You can do vector drawing, digital painting, and design, and flash animations all in one application for under 99 bucks. Not to forget the powerful webplus package that allows you to build your website with web design tools, photo editing, and vector drawing capabilities, along with 3d object, and text style design in an all in one application for under 100 bucks. I don’t know whats going to happen to the larger companies that are the major hitters in the art and graphics industry. It seems to me a lot of the software these companies providing are getting unnecessarily complicated, over priced, and have to many separate programs that you have to go in and out of, with far too many bells and whistles! you know  to much content, to much junk in an application. Sometimes less is better; It would help if the software was more specific to the customers needs, and more sufficient. It seems the larger software companies do this to make more money. There is nothing wrong with wanting to make more money but sooner or later these companies will have to change with the times. Once company owners that buy the software realize how universal and powerful other reputable software companies,  and up and coming software are, is going to really make this art and graphics competition really interesting. Seriously, when you think about it; there are so many graphics applications that can do the same thing, they can import and export into each others applications, just as powerful, and are now a fraction of the cost. One problem with the heavy hitters is the price tag. Who can afford these prices? Majority are the companies. If your an artist, designer (professional or student), it’s a good chance you’ll purchase a different brand that you can afford. I think the companies pay for the more expensive programs that upgrade every year(that really don’t have many new features that will make a difference) because some really don’t know since they’re not working with the software. They just buy it because of mainstream hype. I think companies will start to catch on more as they start relating with experienced artists and designers that use other applications that get the job done just as well as more expensive applications. Applications are getting cheaper, powerful, universal, faster, and require less separate softwares to create and design. Thats where it’s going. What will result from this

Inkscape Design Software

March 19, 2010

Inkscape Software is a free advanced vector software program for those interested in graphic design solutions and digital drawing. For those familiar with Adobe Illustrator, Corel Draw, Draw Plus, etc. You have an idea of the type of art and design work you can create with this software.  I think it’s a great program that packs a lot of power. Especially considering that its free. I will be showing my own creations from the program in upcoming posts. in the mean time here is a link to download the software.

http://www.inkscape.org/download/?lang=en

Link for inkscape manual

http://tavmjong.free.fr/INKSCAPE/MANUAL/html/index.php

Click here for screen shots of graphics created in inkscape.

http://files.uberdownloads.com/software/vector-graphics/inkscape.html#

Here’s a brief summary of the Inkscape program.

What is Inkscape?

Inkscape is an open-source vector graphics editor similar to Adobe Illustrator, Corel Draw, Freehand, or Xara X. What sets Inkscape apart is its use of Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG), an open XML-based W3C standard, as the native format.

What are vector graphics?

In contrast to raster (bitmap) graphics editors such as Photoshop or Gimp, Inkscape stores its graphics in a vector format. Vector graphics is a resolution-independent description of the actual shapes and objects that you see in the image. A rasterization engine uses this information to determine how to plot each line and curve at any resolution or zoom level.

Contrast that to bitmap (raster) graphics which is always bound to a specific resolution and stores an image as a grid of pixels.

Vector graphics are a complement, rather than an alternative, to bitmap graphics. Each has its own purpose and are useful for different kinds of things. Raster graphics tend to be better for photographs and some kinds of artistic drawings, whereas vectors are more suitable for design compositions, logos, images with text, technical illustrations, etc.

Note that Inkscape can import and display bitmap images, too. An imported bitmap becomes yet another object in your vector graphics, and you can do with it everything you can do to other kinds of objects (move, transform, clip, etc.)

What is ‘Scalable Vector Graphics’?

Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) is an open, industry-standard XML-based format for vector graphics developed by the W3C. Its acceptance is growing fast. Most vector editors these days can import and export SVG, and modern browsers (such as Firefox and Opera) can display it directly, i.e. without requiring any plugins. (For Internet Explorer, there’s an SVG Viewer plugin from Adobe.) For more information, see SVG topics below.

Is Inkscape ready for regular users to use?

Yes! While Inkscape does not have all the features of the leading vector editors, the latest versions provide for a large portion of basic vector graphics editing capabilities. People report successfully using Inkscape in a lot of very different projects (web graphics, technical diagrams, icons, creative art, logos, maps). For example, thousands of images on Wikipedia are created_with_Inkscape, as is the majority of the content on openclipart; many examples of Inkscape art can be seen here and here. We try to always keep the codebase usable for real users, as we believe that a tight iteration cycle between users and developers will give best results. You can start using Inkscape alongside your other tools now!

What platforms does Inkscape run on?

We provide binary packages for Linux, Windows 2000/2003/XP (fully self-contained installer), and OSX (dmg package). We know that Inkscape is successfully used on FreeBSD and other Unix-like operating systems. Note that Windows 98/ME is no longer supported.

How did Inkscape start?

Inkscape was started as a fork of Sodipodi, in late 2003, by four Sodipodi developers: Bryce Harrington, MenTaLguY, Nathan Hurst, and Ted Gould. Our mission was creating a fully compliant Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG) drawing tool written in C++ with a new, more user friendly (GNOME Human Interface Guidelines (HIG) compliant) interface and an open, community-oriented development process. Within several months the project had produced several releases, demonstrating a sequence of significant new features and improvements to the codebase and quickly established Inkscape as a noteworthy Open Source project.

What does ‘Inkscape’ mean?

The name is made up of the two English words ‘ink’ and ‘scape’. Ink is a common substance for drawings, and is used when the sketched work is ready to be permanently committed to paper, and thus evokes the idea that Inkscape is ready for production work. A scape is a view of a large number of objects, such as a landscape or ocean-scape, and thus alludes to the object-oriented nature of vector imagery.

Can I create webpages with it?

Sort of.

Many webpage authors use Inkscape for webpage mockups or to generate parts of web pages, such as banners, logos, icons, and more.

With the recent advances in SVG support in web browsers (such as Firefox or Opera), using SVG directly on the web becomes more of a possibility. For example, with Firefox 1.5 or better, you can open any Inkscape SVG document right in the browser, and Firefox will show it correctly. In theory, SVG and XHTML can be used together within the same document, so interested users or developers can explore this possibility further.

Unfortunately, even though SVG is the internet standard for vector graphics, some older (but still common) web browsers fail to support SVG.

Web page authors who need to support widest variety of web browsers convert each SVG graphic to a raster image (.png) as the very last step.

How do I make a SVG object that link to an internet site when I click on it ?

You can create clickable links from objects in Inkscape by right clicking the object, and clicking ‘Create Link’. Then, right click your new link and choose ‘Link Properties’ to set the web address and many other properties.

Another way to make objects into web links is to edit the XML directly. Inside Inkscape, open the XML editor (Shift+Ctrl+X) … or use your favorite text editor.

First look at the <svg> element and try adding the following if it’s not there already:

http://www.inkscape.org/download/?lang=en

Link for inkscape manual

http://tavmjong.free.fr/INKSCAPE/MANUAL/html/index.php

Click here for screen shots of graphics created in inkscape.

http://files.uberdownloads.com/software/vector-graphics/inkscape.html#

Earlier studies of the head with Riven Phoenix

February 25, 2010

Riven phoenix demonstrated a technique of studying the skull from a very thorough approach. I believe it was a Leonardo Davinci system. I know it seems time consuming but it’s worthwhile to try. It will make it much easier for you when you use the simpler approach. Also note this is a technical approach vs an artistic approach to drawing the skull. This gives the appearance of an angular,  sharp looking skull. It’s fine as were just generalizing the skull. You can always touch it up using an anatomy book. Click on thumnail to enlarge image.

Want to learn how to draw the human figure?

December 19, 2009

I am very excited to give my first review on the most incredible step by step video tutorials by Riven Phoenix on Learning how to draw the human figure from your mind. There are so many reasons why this is an incredible learning tool, For starters, the first 5 lessons taught me more about the figure than I learned in school, books, or anywhere else. Riven includes a 5 disk, 43 hours of video tutorials for $49.00. Imagine how much you would pay for college courses! Also, going along he reveals formulas for learning and memorizing the basic proportions of the figure, along with direct and indirect approaches for drawing the figure. He gives technical as well as spontaneous artistic approaches to drawing. Never have I stumbled upon so much information and education for a small price. Don’t hesitate to get this drawing package if your thinking about drawing or already drawing; Want to be a concept artist? Character designer, medical illustrator? This series will help artists on all levels unleash their artistic skills and creativity.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tFxHEZP_70c

http://inventiontocompletehumanbeing.blogspot.com/